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Kite Flying

Kite Flying Rating:
List Price: $7.99
Sale Price: $3.35
(as of 06/24/2017 03:07 UTC - Details)

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Product Description

The family from Dim Sum for Everyone! is back for a new outing– building and flying their own kite! The wind is blowing. It is a good day for kites! The whole family makes a trip to the local craft store for paper, glue, and paint. Everyone has a job: Ma-Ma joins sticks together. Ba-Ba glues paper. Mei-Mei cuts whiskers while Jie-Jie paints a laughing mouth. Dragon eyes are added and then everyone attaches the final touch . . . a noisemaker! Now their dragon kite is ready to fly.Kite Flying celebrates the Chinese tradition of kite making and kite flying and lovingly depicts a family bonded by this ancient and modern pleasure.

Details

  • Dragonfly Books

Kite Flying 4.8 out of 5 based on 14 ratings. 266 user reviews
Kite Books Kite Flying The family from Dim Sum for Everyone! is back for a new outing– building and flying their own kite! The wind is blowing. It is a good day for kites! The whole family makes a trip to the local craft store for paper, glue, and paint. Everyone has a job: Ma-Ma joins sticks together. Ba-Ba glues paper. Mei-Mei cuts whiskers while Jie-Jie paints a laughing mouth. Dragon eyes are added and then everyone attaches the final touch . . . a noisemaker! Now their dragon kite is ready to fly.Kite Flying celebrates the Chinese tradition of kite making and kite flying and lovingly depicts a family bonded by this ancient and modern pleasure. $7.99 https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51W3dty%2BU6L._SL160_.jpg
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5 Responses to “Kite Flying”

  • Michael J. Mazza says:

    Rating

    In “Kite Flying,” by Grace Lin, a family makes a dragon kite together and then takes it out for a flight. It’s a simple story that effectively combines brightly colored illustrations with an easy-to-read text. Sample text: “It is a good day for kites.” It’s an enjoyable story that is also a positive portrayal of a family at work on a project together.

    At the end of the book is a short supplemental article which describes the history of kite flying and discusses some Chinese traditions related to this activity. There is also an illustrated gallery of various animal kites: butterfly, crab, fish, etc.

  • Sue Lin Yee says:

    Rating

    I purchased this book for my soon to be 3 year old who recently became very fascinated with kites. The pictures are beautiful and level and length is perfect for toddlers. The story is about how the family makes a kite together and then flies it among other beautiful kites.

  • Roger says:

    Rating

    Grace Lin’s illustrations are instantly recognizable and always a joy to see.

    In Kite Flying she takes us on a journey that shares a famous Chinese past time– Kite Flying.

    We get to watch a Chinese family build a Kite, and see all of the pieces that go into a kite.

    More importantly, this book highlights a key cultural element that so many Chinese people share.

    Yet, it is the universal appeal of kite flying and the imagery that speaks emotion that children will remember.

    Grace is an amazing artist, and I look forward to seeing how her writing evolves and pushes her illustrations to new heights.

    There are so few books on Chinese culture, and even fewer artists who have the ability to bring these stories uniquely to life as Grace Lin Does.

    I recommend Kite Flying for all children boys and girls, and I hope this book will influence children to make their own kites and fly them.

    Kite Flying is a book that I think will draw children away from their televisions and out into the world to experience life first hand.

    Bravo Grace Lin Bravo!

  • KSL says:

    Rating

    I like that this book starts as soon as you open the book.. not 3 pages later! On the inside cover with items one might use to make a kite. The next page shows the narrator and her family at the store picking out these items on a beautiful windy day made for kite flying!

    I like that Grace Lin uses the Chinese names for each of family members Baba- dad, Mei Mei – little sister, Jie-Jie older sister and everyone know who Ma-Ma is! Each page is a visual treat for the readers eyes.

    Once the story ends, the book doesn’t end there Grace tells the readers a brief history of kites and how the Chinese thought that kites could carry away their bad luck & talk to the spirits in the sky. Kites where also in the shapes that the person flying it wished to possess. The author shares that a dragon kite symbolizes power, widom and wealth. She also talks China’s annual kite-flying day the double 9 festival and how kite flying spread through out the world. Turn the page, this book continues on showing the reader different types of kites in all sorta of animals and what they stand for!

    I also love that when read the little blurp about the author she talks of flying kites with her family and that her favorite kite was a store bought kite called King Kong and how that one day while flying broke free and that Grace still wonders if it’s still up there in the sky somewhere flying! I hope she’s right!

  • Larry Mark says:

    Rating

    Grace Lin’s pages are filled with spirograph-like swirls, bright patterns, bold colors, and even more colors. The inside cover is filled with drawings of the tools needed to make a kite (paper, scissors, paint, glue, etc), while the back inside cover is filled with the meanings attributed to the types of kites you fly (dragons for wisdom, dragonflies for Summer, butterflies for love, fish for abundance, taods for long life, etc). The whole family is involved in making the feng zheng kite, and then they ascend a hill to fly it with other families. She closes the book by asking the reader to imagine what people’s kites are saying about their wishes and desires.